FYA: The New Work Reality

FYA: The New Work Reality

TITLE: The New Work Reality
AUTHOR: Foundation for Young Australians

Preparing young people for the new work reality
Following the journeys of 14,000 young people over a decade, the New Work Reality report reveals the factors that accelerate the transition to full-time work, including the skills, mindset and confidence young people need to navigate our changed world of work.

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Blog: The case for transformation

Blog: The case for transformation

TITLE: The case for transformation
AUTHOR: Rob McIntosh

Every young person has the right to an education providing them with the capabilities to live a fulfilling life.

Despite good intentions, many of our young people are still not being given this opportunity. Given the rapid changes occurring in the world of work, technology, society and global inter-connectedness, ensuring every child has this opportunity requires a new vision for education and a bold, transformative action agenda.

The teaching and learning that will equip learners best in this new world is experiential, engages the passion and interests of each individual learner and supports them to develop and pursue life goals in ways and at a pace that meet their needs and aspirations.  Such learning does not focus primarily on the transmission of knowledge. Instead learning which integrates knowledge, accessed from a wide range of sources, with the development of key competencies will build the capabilities needed to tackle real world challenges which are meaningful to the learner and important for society.   

Learning like this offers the best chance of addressing current inequities because it is a strengths rather than deficit-based approach which engages the whole learner in a way that relates to the reality of his or her life.

We have many examples of learning like this already occurring, but not as standard practice. Unless we are very intentional in making it so, we will not equip all learners for the future they deserve and society needs.  Those most likely to miss out will be those who have missed out most in the past.

Achieving the full-scale system transformation we need will require a new national vision for the future of learning, a compelling story of the future, built by broad consensus and reinforced by leaders at all levels of the education system.

It will also involve a core recognition that the learning that is needed occurs in an ecosystem, where many participants are engaged in enabling each learner to learn the capabilities required in local, national and increasingly global contexts. Those involved in supporting learners in this  are not only educational professionals, as important as they are, but are found in the community,  business,  philanthropic bodies, tertiary organisations and, of course, government. Creating this ecosystem requires that all participants work collaboratively towards the shared vision, guided by effective leadership and supportive national policy frameworks.

To make this a reality we must invest in building the required professional capability; take a fresh look at the resources required to secure learning success; create an environment in which innovation not only flourishes in one location but contributes to changed practice in other locations; foster learning in a wide range of settings beyond the traditional school boundaries and with a broader range of contributors; and set in place the policy frameworks that will enable and support transformation of teaching and learning.

Read Rob’s paper Future directions in New Zealand schooling: The case for transformation here.

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Why the design of Education 2.0 must begin now

Why the design of Education 2.0 must begin now

BLOG: Why the design of Education 2.0 must begin now
AUTHOR: Jan Owen AM, CEO of Foundation for Young Australians

This month I went to Moscow, Russia at the invitation of the Global Education Leaders Partnership (GELP) to present FYA’s New Work Order research on young people and the future of work.

The pre-summit introduction included our Russian hosts explaining Russia to us by quoting Winston Churchill, who famously said: “Russia is a riddle, wrapped in a mystery, inside an enigma.”

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No.8 Re-charged

No.8 Re-charged

TITLE: No.8 Re-charged
AUTHOR: David Downs, Dr Michelle Dickinson

No. 8 Recharged is a beautifully curated collection of 202 world changing innovations from New Zealand. Each company is profiled by David Downs and Dr Michelle Dickinson, with the real story behind that company explored in a witty, intelligent way.

Presented in a unique, silver paperback form, this 210-page book will stand out on any coffee table, reception table or bookshelf.

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Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era

Most Likely to Succeed: Preparing Our Kids for the Innovation Era

TITLE: Most Likely to Succeed
AUTHOR: Tony Wagner, Ted Dintersmith

The basis for a major documentary, two leading experts sound an urgent call for the radical reimagining of American education so we can equip students for the realities of the twenty-first-century economy. “If you read one book about education this decade, make it this one” (Adam Braun, bestselling author and founder of Pencils of Promise).

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New method of measuring skills employers desire proves popular

New method of measuring skills employers desire proves popular

Director of 21C, Justine Munro told Mike Hosking these skills are just as important as academic studies.

A New Zealand company has adapted an American model of testing, aimed at measuring skills that employers find most useful.

ACT-Tessera is a unique questioning model which looks at skills that work places prioritise - tenacity, leadership curiosity and teamwork.

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